World Geography

In: Business and Management

Submitted By venky401
Words 1328
Pages 6
INITIALS TYPE OF CONNECTION LOCATION FREQUENCY OF CONNECTION MODE OF CONNECTION
SAI FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
NARENDRA FRIEND INDIA MONTHLY telephone
NAVEEN FRIEND INDIA MONTHLY telephone
ALI FRIEND INDIA MONTHLY telephone
DEEPAK FRIEND INDIA MONTHLY telephone
MAHIDAR FRIEND CANADA MONTHLY Face-to-face
NEELESH FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
SAI KIRAN RELATIVE BRAZIL MONTHLY telephone
BHASKAR FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
ANISH FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
SATISH FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
ASHISH BROTHER US MONTHLY telephone
ABHILASH BROTHER AUSTRALIA MONTHLY telephone
ABHINAV BROTHER AUSTRALIA MONTHLY Telephone
KALYAN RELATIVE US DAILY Telephone
PREETHI FRIEND INDIA DAILY Telephone
SRAVYA FRIEND DOHA MONTHLY Text messaging
AISHWARYA FRIEND US DAILY Telephone
MADHULIKA FRIEND INDIA MONTHLY Text messaging
BALU FRIEND US DAILY Text messaging
ARAVIND FRIEND INDIA MONTHLY Text messaging
ESWAR FRIEND INDIA MONTHLY Text messaging
JOHN RELATIVE CANADA MONTHLY Telephone
PRASAD RELATIVE US YEARLY Text messaging
RAJITHA FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
ANITHA FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
TEJA FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
FAHEEM CLASSMATE CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
HARISH CLASSMATE CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
KRANTHI CLASSMATE CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
KATHE CLASSMATE CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
RANJITH FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
SAMPATH FRIEND US YEARLY Telephone
HAPPY CLASSMATE CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
VASANTHI FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
SURYA FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
SOWMYA FREND CANADA MONTHLY Telephone
HARSHA FRIEND CANADA MONTHLY Telephone
RAKESH FRIEND CANADA MONTHLY Telephone
DEESHA CLASSMATE CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
AGTSAYA FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
NAVEEN FRIEND CANADA DAILY Face-to-face
PRATHIMA FRIEND UK DAILY Telephone
SNEHA FRIEND US DAILY Telephone
NARESH…...

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