The United States Constitution vs the Patriot Act

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The Patriot Act Vs The United States Constitution
Khadija Nurul Hasan
Chaffey College

The Patriot Act Vs The United States Constitution The “Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism” Act, or Patriot Act was passed on October 24th, 2001 with almost all legislators in favor of it. The terrorist attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, sparked a nationwide desire for heightened security and increased abilities for law-enforcement agencies to track and stop terrorists. Thus, the Patriot Act was created in response, and passed with the aim of battling terrorism. However there are always two sides to any passing of a political law: those who support it and those who oppose it. Those who support the Patriot Act have consistently countered that the provisions of the Act are necessary to protect the people from future terrorist attacks, and that the law does an adequate job of protecting individual civil liberties; while those who oppose it argue that the Act is an egregious assault on individual liberties as it violates their constitutional rights. The hypothesis of this paper is to dissect and analyze Sections of the Patriot Act to see if they are in violation of the United States Constitution. Specifically the paper will analyze Sections 505, 215 of the Patriot Act to see if they violate the Constitution.
The first violation in question comes from Section 505 of the Patriot Act. Section 505 expands the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the FBI’s authority to issue National Security Letters or NSLs demanding customer records from various public establishments. According to the American Civil Liberties Union (2011), an organization dedicated to the protection of the constitutional rights of the people, “The National Security Letter provision of the…...

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