Starbucks Analyze

In: Business and Management

Submitted By innayadex
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1. Analyze the buyer decision process of a traditional Porsche customer.

Porsche has traditionally developed a low volume and increasingly fragmented auto market. The availability of only a few high end models created an image of exclusivity. It is the image of exclusivity that is most important to Porsche consumers. They want their car to represent how successful they are.

2. Contrast the traditional Porsche customer decision process to the decision process for a Cayenne or Panamera customer.

As opposed to the traditional Porsche consumer who is concerned with the way the car sounds, vibrates, and feels, a consumer deciding between the Cayenne and Panamera will take into consideration factors such as size and practicality. Interestingly, both consumers are likely to be focused on factors such as speed and brand image.

3. Which concepts from the chapter explain why Porsche sold so many lower-priced models in the 1970’s and 1980’s?

• Cultural Factors (social class): having a Porsche is always meant for upper class status, and having a Porsche allows customers to relate with this class. The Porsche 914 was an alternative presented to consumers who could not afford a traditional Porsche, but wanted the image of the brand.

• Personal Factors (economic situation): in the 1970’s and 80’s, Porsche took into consideration consumers with lower income, so they produced affordable vehicles based on the social class, the status, and the family needs of these consumers.

• Psychological Factors (beliefs and attitudes): the perception of social esteem among members of society led Porsche to develop cars that allowed users to feel as if they belonged to the exclusive market, without having to sacrifice their lifestyle.

4. Explain how both positive and negative attitudes toward a brand like Porsche develop. How might Porsche…...

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