Rehabilitation and Not Incarceration

In: English and Literature

Submitted By charlotteg10
Words 1700
Pages 7
ENG 105 Why Rehabilitation Works and Imprisonment Does Not
The drug epidemic is something that has affected many families all over the world. Drug abuse puts a lot of stress on parents, brothers, sisters, and grandparents – anyone who is part of the home (“Alcohol”). Along with the drug epidemic comes the criminal activity to obtain the drugs. Our nation’s prison population has exploded beyond capacity and most inmates are in prison, in large part, because of substance abuse: 80% of offenders abuse drugs or alcohol; nearly 50% of jail and prison inmates are clinically addicted; approximately 60% of individuals are arrested for most types of crimes test positive for illegal drugs at arrest (“Alcohol”). Although the current system emphasizes putting addicts in jail, it would be more beneficial for them and society to enter into inpatient rehabilitation. The relationship between drugs and crime is very complex. At the most intense levels of drug use, drugs and crimes are directly and highly connected. Serious drug use can amplify and prolong preexisting criminal activity. There are essentially three types of crimes related to drugs: Use-Related crime: These are crimes that result from or involve individuals who ingest drugs, and who commit crimes as a result of the effect the drug has on their processes and behavior. Economic-Related crime: These are crimes where an individual commits a crime in order to fund a drug habit. These include theft and prostitution. System-Related crime: These are crimes that result from the structure of the drug system. They include production, manufacture, transportation, and sale of drugs, as well as violence related to the production or sale of drugs, such as a turf war (“Alcohol”). Many with drug use dependency are more likely to be arrested for crimes such as burglary, or theft; crimes often related to “feeding the habit.”…...

Similar Documents

The Purpose of Incarceration

...There are five goals of incarceration, they are: punishment, deterrence, incapacitation, rehabilitation, and restitution. Seiter describes the goals as follows: Punishment is the infliction of pain or suffering. Deterrence is a goal focused on future actions (or the avoidance of certain actions) by both individuals and society. Incapacitation is a goal that reduces offenders’ ability of capacity to commit further crimes. Rehabilitation means to prepare them for a crime free and successful life. Restitution is making right by repaying society or victims for the wrongs done by offenders (Seiter, 2011, pg 17). “The expectations that society has for the criminal justice system is to punish and rehabilitate individuals who commit crimes. Punishment and rehabilitation are also two of the four acknowledged objectives of the criminal justice system, with deterrence and incapacitation being the others. In the United States, punishment has always been the primary goal to achieve when dealing with individuals who commit acts of crime. Many theorists throughout history have argued which is more effective, punishment or rehabilitation. The effectiveness of punishment and rehabilitation has been analyzed to see the effects on victims and offenders and also the social and fiscal impact on our society. The Classical School of Criminology has proposed that punishment is used to create deterrence and the Positive School of Criminology uses the practice of rehabilitation to reduce......

Words: 1143 - Pages: 5

Incarceration

...ceration Incarceration and Religiosity in a Male Inmate Population Robert Ellery Loomis ADMJ 240W Section 003 Fall 2006 Robert Ellery Loomis ADMJ 240 W Section 003 Incarceration and Religiosity in a Male Inmate Population John Locke said that "good and evil, reward and punishment, are the only motives to a rational creature: these are the spur and reins whereby all mankind are set on work, and guided." The need for removal of persons who commit acts against society as a whole has been a part of human nature. However, is it possible to reintroduce these people back into society and have them be an active and appropriate member of society? I have chosen to examine whether or not religious affiliations while incarcerated assist in the rehabilitation and lack of re-offense upon release. This area deserves additional research, after this study, due to the fact that about 5.6 million, about one out of every thirty-seven people are incarcerated in the United States (NCIS). If researchers can find a more effective way to reduce the level of recidivism; this in turn will decrease the number of incarcerated United States citizens and allow the governmental appropriation to be allocated to other needs. The following study, Religiousness and Post-Release Community Adjustment in the United States, 1990-1998, will be used to determine these three hypotheses: (1) that......

Words: 3383 - Pages: 14

Incarceration Essay

...Curran Dwyer - Incarceration Essay Two October 25, 2009 The American Dream is predicated on the myth that in America, anyone can do anything if they have talent and a willingness to work hard. The implicit corollary is that if you end up poor, it is your own fault because you aren’t smart enough, you didn’t work hard enough, or both. Research suggests otherwise. A number of factors that play important roles in determining the life outcome of the individual are completely beyond the control of the individual. These factors include task commitment, positive reinforcement, good social skills, access to opportunity, good health, and good luck (Comer, 1997). Most government policy at the state and federal level, including long-term incarceration and the lack of social support systems, has been established based on the myth that the individual alone is responsible for his or her life outcome. My firm belief is that this is not true (Comer, 1997, 2000; Comer, Ben-Avie, Joyner, 1993), and that a primary responsibility of government is to provide opportunity to the disenfranchised. By rethinking criminal policy and sentencing, and by instituting broad social support and public works programs, the government will begin to repair its relationship with urban black communities and will move the United States closer to a realization of the American dream. The foundation the government will use to repair the relationship it has with its urban black citizens should be a series of......

Words: 2041 - Pages: 9

Why Rehabilitation

...Why Rehabilitation Karmella Moten Kaplan University The penal system today is a multi-million dollar industry, with about 1,325 state and 84 federal prisons the entire country has the capacity to incarcerate its criminal population. The past three decades will be remembered as a time of overwhelming imprisonment, because of the concerns with community protection reaching an outstanding high, with the firm drug laws and strict repeat offenders putting more people behind bars. Incarceration, however, is not the main objective of prisons; they also serve two important purposes, punishment and rehabilitation. Prisons have been designed and operated for years with these two objectives in mind; sometimes the punishment and the rehabilitation are separate from one another, most of the time they go hand in hand, the punishment for the crime and the rehabilitation to return to society. Punishment is the infliction of a penalty as retribution for an offense. There are several ways our correctional system punishes offenders today, ranging from confinement to capital punishment, confinement being the most predominant. This includes: tight living quarters, sometimes solitary confinement, strict house rules and minimal contact with the outside world, all of which can be draining on an inmate’s morale. The death penalty is the harshest punishment the court system can impose. It has come in many forms since its birth and has become very controversial in recent years. Though now......

Words: 913 - Pages: 4

Rehabilitation Paper

...Rehabilitation Pap CAJ: Introduction to Corrections . Rehabilitation Paper The goal of rehabilitation came during the middle of the twentieth century when corrections adopted a medical model, in which crime was believed to be the result of an underlying pathology of offenders that could be diagnosed and treated (Seiter, 2011). Offenders were considered sick and in need of treatment to prepare them to return to the community as productive, law-abiding citizens. Correctional agencies implemented a variety of treatment programs to improve offenders and to provide them with the tools necessary to be successful members of society (Seiter, 2011). The need for rehabilitation of offenders was emphasized by the Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice, appointed by President Lyndon Johnson in 1966, which noted a need for “substantial upgrading” of the correctional system and its reorientation “toward integration of offenders into community life” (Seiter, 2011). Throughout the years, many processes have been created to form the rehabilitation process of criminal justice. This process has reached out to many offenders and their families by allowing them to return to the community as changed individuals. Rehabilitation has many different process, but most, if not all have been proven successful in returning offenders to the community as changed individuals (Seiter, 2011). Rehabilitation is defined as a return to a previous form. In criminal justice,......

Words: 1454 - Pages: 6

Rehabilitation

...Rehabilitation Stefanie Dean CJS/230 May 26, 2013 Martin Grill Rehabilitation Although many individuals consider rehabilitation as a form of humane punishment for criminal offenders, it is actually a means of therapy rather than punishment. The objective of rehabilitation is to reform the offender so that he or she can return to the free world with the ability to lead a productive life free of crime. The rehabilitative ideal views criminal behavior as similar to a disease which should be treated with the scientific methods available in order to “cure” the offender. Many criminals suffer from mental and physical ailments, drug addiction, and limited opportunities to become successful; these issues increase the likelihood that they will eventually engage in criminal activity. If we merely incarcerate them while they “pay their debt to society”, they will most likely return to society only with additional difficulties; without the proper tools to know how to live appropriately. The additional difficulties gained from incarceration are: a criminal record that impacts the opportunity for employment, they will be older and still without marketable skills or the education needed, social relationships as well as social skills may have deteriorated during the time spent incarcerated and they may have become acclimated to the criminal environment and culture. Incarcerating offenders may actually increase recidivism rates. A rehabilitative approach, as opposed to a......

Words: 830 - Pages: 4

Rehabilitation

...Rehabilitation Paper Zahra Howard CJA 234 Professor King June 14, 2014 Rehabilitation Paper Each day in the United States, the correctional system supervises over six million of its residents. Approximately two million people are in prison or jail, while four million are on probation or parole. With so many people under its control, a central policy issue is what the correctional system hopes to accomplish with those it places behind bars or on community supervision. A simple response might be that the purpose of these correctional sanctions is to punish the criminally wayward. Since the inception of the American penitentiary in the 1820s, however, corrections has embraced as an important goal the transformation of law breakers into the law-abiding that is, rehabilitation or treatment. At times, the goal of reforming offenders has been dominant; at other times, its legitimacy and usefulness have been challenged and its influence on correctional policy diminished. But even today, after a period in the late 1900s of prolonged advocacy of getting tough with criminals, rehabilitation remains an integral part of the correctional enterprise and continues to earn support among the public in the United States. To begin, probation refers to adult offenders whom courts place on supervision in the community through a probation agency, generally in lieu of incarceration. However, some jurisdictions do sentence probationers to a combined short-term incarceration sentence......

Words: 1177 - Pages: 5

Drug Addicts Need Rehabilitation Not Incarceration

...Drug Addicts Need Rehabilitation Not Incarceration Drug addiction is a dependence on an illegal drug or medication and unfortunately causes an intense craving for the drug. These cravings can be so extreme that it causes users to find any means possible to get the drug which can easily lead to criminal activity and charges, which ultimately leads to time spent behind bars. Jails and prisons within the United States are already overpopulated, and drug addicts are just adding to the already extremely high numbers. In order to help alleviate this problem there needs to be some changes made with the way addicts are dealt with. Some serious thought needs to be given as to why the justice system chooses to incarcerate addicts instead of sentencing them to court mandated rehabilitation centers. By doing this, the addict would be forced to face the real issue which landed the individual in the situation to begin with, the addiction. Addicts need to be offered some sort of rehabilitation, whether it is inside or outside, only offering incarceration with no rehabilitation should not be an option. Without the addict dealing with the addiction head on, there is a slim chance of becoming productive members of society and a greater chance of making another appearance behind the prison walls. When it comes to whether addicts should be offered treatment or not, and if so where, whether it be in prison or outside, if they should be offered any at all, opinions vary quite drastically. Many......

Words: 1980 - Pages: 8

Rehabilitation

...Rehabilitation Paper CJS/230 Introduction to Corrections September 14, 2014 In this paper, there will be thorough evaluations made about issues revolving around in prisons. It is a sticky topic being that reformers look to see if a prisoner can be rehabilitated in order to regain entrance into functioning society. Once this information is accessed, then can the prisoner be eligible for forms of release, including, parole, probation, community service, and other methods of early release. The main function in the correctional system has been, in the past, to rehabilitate criminal offenders and teach them how to become citizens who live a life free from crime. Some rehabilitation programs used to reform inmates include counseling, health and fitness programs, academic programs and religious programs. This is the basis for the discussion presented in this paper. The topics to be discussed include, defining rehabilitation, the origins of rehabilitation, prisoner rehabilitation and society, and the suggested improvement of rehabilitation. All of which are imperative to the understanding of the rehabilitation of prisoners. The definition of rehabilitation in the prison setting is, “something that makes a prisoner a better person” (Foster, 2006). Now, with this definition there is much controversy. The problem is, when speaking on making a prisoner better, you still have to wonder, is the prisoner better all around, or is he just better at becoming a different......

Words: 987 - Pages: 4

Drugs and Rehabilitation

...Drugs and Rehabilitation COH318 The current drug policy in the United States is ineffective. The war on drugs costs the Federal and State government a total of $47,136,706,050.00, and rising every second. While the prices are rising, people are simultaneously destroying lives and punishing victims. Rehabilitation is a sensible, cost effective alternative and has been shown to be more effective in producing change. The ultimate goal of drug rehab is to enable the individual to achieve lasting abstinence from drug use. The price of locking up drug offenders rises as the amount of space lessens in our prisons. The cost to put a single drug dealer is about $450,000 and the cost for arrest and conviction is $150,000. The same $450,000 can provide treatment and/or education for about 200 people. In consideration, putting a person in prison produces about fifteen dollars in related welfare costs, for every dollar spent on incarceration. Every dollar spent on treatment and education saves about five dollars relating to welfare costs. States are spending more money on prisons than education. Over the course of the last 20 years, the amount of money spent on prisons was increased by 570% while that spent on elementary and secondary education was increased by only 33%. Most states are facing hefty budget deficits, and with approximately 80 percent or more of total incarcerations are drug related in some way. It is also forcing state lawmakers to......

Words: 922 - Pages: 4

Rationales of Incarceration

...Rationales of Incarceration as Punishment and Alternative Methods The Government has several theories to support the use of incarceration as punishment. Which can be divided into two main categories: utilitarian and retributive. The utilitarian theory seeks to discourage “deter” future crimes by punishing the offender. The retributive theory seeks to punish offenders because they deserve to be punished. If one looks future into the reasons we punish criminals, one can find a number of justifications for using punishment. "Most criminal justice scholars agree [though] that there are four primary justifications for criminal punishment; retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, and rehabilitation.” (The drug trade, 2004-2005, p. 206) The first rationale is deterrence which is let’s use this person as an example so they and others will not commit a crime. I feel the main reason we use incarceration is to punish the offender and to maintain order in society. Some believe that when you punish an offender it will deter them from a lifetime of future crime as well as others in society. You have to ask yourself does incarceration deter crime. The short answer is both yes and no. Some will learn from their mistakes and not do it again and others will not care. Some believe that deterrence is useful in deterring convicted offenders from committing other crimes and will deter others in society from committing crimes. If a person knows that they will be punished if caught committing...

Words: 826 - Pages: 4

Incarceration

...prisons, and more than 5 million Americans were under other forms of custodial supervision, including probation and parole, for a total of 7.2 million Americans-3.2 percent of the US population-under some form of custodial of supervisory control of the criminal justice system (120).” African American men make up a majority of the US prison population. This is bad being that some African American men are look down upon. It was mentioned that all African Americans men that are incarcerated is about 5 percent compared to the 1 percent white men that are incarcerated. This means that African Americans men are 10 times more like to be incarnated then white men. Thesis: The purpose of this essay is to analyze the causes to African American incarceration such as racial profiling, sentencing disparities, and exonerations; having a life is not what they have. ......

Words: 667 - Pages: 3

Juvenile Rehabilitation

...Juvenile Rehabilitation Shelly Stanko CJS/240 February 26, 2012 Farrell Binder Juvenile Rehabilitation In the previous few decades, the United States justice policy has become more punitive. In particular, in the 1990s legislatures all over the county passed laws under which an increasing number of young people can be charged in criminal courts and incarcerated in adult prisons. Certainly, in nearly every state today, youths between 13 and 14 can be prosecuted and penalized as adults for an array of crimes including non-violent offenses (Kristin, 2009). Punishments have become more severe even in the juvenile system. Generally, it is believed that the rising anxiety among citizens concerning the threat of juvenile crime has propelled this tendency and that members of the public favor this legislative tendency toward severe punishment. However, it is unclear whether this opinion about the right solutions to youth crime is precise. On the other hand, different surveys have found the public favors tougher policies regarding youth crime and punishing juveniles as severely as adults. However, a thorough review of sources of information about public views indicates that the perception that the public favors punishment for youths is largely based on either opinion surveys that pose few simplistic questions or publicized crimes like school shootings. It is possible that analysis of public......

Words: 1875 - Pages: 8

Incarceration

...Running head: ALTERNATIVE SOLUTIONS TO INCARCERATION Alternative Solutions to Incarceration Meral Daniel Southern New Hampshire University Alternative Solutions to Incarceration Incarceration is the result after a crime is committed by an individual and has a number of objectives. Primarily, it is intended to keep persons who have committed a crime under secure control and to punish them by depriving them of their liberty. Imprisonment keeps them from committing further crimes while they are incarcerated “and, in theory, allows them to be rehabilitated during their period of imprisonment. The goal of rehabilitation is to address the underlying factors that led to criminal behavior and by so doing, reducing the likelihood of re-offending. However, it is precisely this objective that is generally not being met by imprisonment. On the contrary, evidence shows that prisons not only rarely rehabilitate, but they tend to further criminalize individuals, leading to re-offending and a cycle of release and imprisonment, which does nothing to reduce overcrowding in prisons or to build safer communities.” (United Nations, 2006) One effective alternative to incarceration is the use of GPS monitoring and it is becoming an increasingly important topic of consideration by state rehabilitation and correction agencies. Location tracking systems, such as GPS, have customarily been used solely to track higher-risk offenders. However...

Words: 592 - Pages: 3

Rehabilitation

...Probation is a sentence of incarceration is suspended, and conditional freedom is granted to a convicted offender, certain requirements of behavior are require maintaining freedom. Parole is a convict granted conditional release from prison before the completion of the sentence The parolee must comply with certain conditions of behavior. After year of living in a tightly structured environment, never making a choice about food or clothing or schedule, an inmate is suddenly faced with the chaos, confusion, and demands of a normal life. Every convict undergoes prisonization, essentially the acculturation into the foreign society of prison. It’s necessary for survival within the culture, but isolates an inmate from the real world to which he or she must eventually return. The values and mores that allow for success in prison are directly counter to the expectations in the community. Upon release the offender returns into society and must adapt to new behaviors as he or she determines their daily schedule, adapts to new technology and changes in the outside world, and a different social interaction styles with people in their home, workplace, and community. Prison Rehabilitation is when a ex prisoner is release from prison and they somehow retrieve and rethink to commit the same crime they did to get themselves in prison. Prison Rehabilitation affects the prison and the society because the prisoner committing the same crimes over and over again and they are not learning......

Words: 426 - Pages: 2