Psychiatry

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Submitted By flint757
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Psychiatry Diagnoses and Treatment Psychological diagnosing has been around for centuries. Before modern medicine most doctors tended to consider mental disorder related to religious reasoning. Later, in the 19th and 20th century, doctors moved more towards actual analysis of the ailing physical being such as lesions or disturbed nerves. Around that same time period Sigmund Freud developed the concept psychoanalysis. This is the process of observing the characteristics of a person to determine if they have a mental disorder and if so what type. This method of psychology has been the standard of treatment since, but with the addition of medication. In 1954 there was the development of the first psychiatric drug, Thorazine. Since then there has been an increase of psychotropic treatment. This is where the problem started. There are many cases of misdiagnoses which before psychotropic drugs would not have been such a dire issue, but with medication, it potentially could be fatal to be misdiagnosed. There are some that say the psychologist follow rigid enough criteria that the rate of failure would be very small. Then there are others who believe that doctors over diagnose disorders, such as bipolar or ADHD, and that they aren’t thorough enough in their studies. My topic of psychiatric diagnoses is controversial. Even though there are many who do not believe in the accuracy of psychiatrists, there are many who still do. During the 20th century there have been many medical advances and books written turning something known as a soft science into a legitimate hard science. To keep psychologist from misdiagnosing patients a book called DSM was written. The DSM is updated periodically and we are currently on the fourth edition. The fifth will be released in 2012. In 1954 Thorazine, an antipsychotic drug to treat schizophrenia was developed that lowered the risk…...

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