Prison Diary

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Reading Questions 1.) In the report ‘A Living Death’, how do the authors explain the dramatic increase in the number of people serving LWOP? What kinds of changes do they propose to reduce this number?
The authors explain the dramatic increase in the number of people serving LWOP as a result of the War on Drugs and “tough-on-crime” polices. These policies paved a road to many unnecessarily harsh sentencing laws. These include three-strike laws and mandatory minimum sentences for non-violence crimes. The authors suggest ending federal nonviolence LWOP sentences, eliminating nonviolent LWOP sentences, reforming the legislation, and much more to help reduce the number of people serving LWOP. 2.) In ‘Prison Diary’, Dole says that it’s the feeling of ‘impotence’ that finally ‘breaks you’ in prison. What does he mean by this?
What dole means, it is the things in life that you realize you will not be able to take part in again is what makes prison the hardest. You are a spectator to your family’s life. You cannot be there for a tragedy, or help them when they are sick. You cannot be a father to your children, or enjoy the little things in life. You care confined behind bars for the rest of your life, and the feeling of not being able to be there in the world for the things that matter the most are the most heartbreaking. 3.) How does Dole explain the ways that healthcare and education are (and are not) part of the supermax prison in which he is confined?

As for the education that is offered in the supermax prison, they have a GED program but do not offer anything more than that. Although they have this program, the inmates are not really encouraged to take part in it, but rather they are discouraged it by prohibiting who can take part in the GED program and who cannot. The teachers are were not help, and you have to almost teach yourself to get through…...

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