Nestle Five Forces

In: Business and Management

Submitted By karthiknair
Words 1304
Pages 6
Case Analysis

Nestle

Group 3

11 February 2010

David Chol, Whitney Drost, Raynard Geason, Sarah Laborde, Casey Landers, Darren McNeely, Vanessa Robicheaux, Nicholas Knight, Taylor Mendel, Jonathan Bush, John Priola, William Ratcliff

Table of Contents

Introduction 3 Goals 3 Constraints 3

Through the years, Nestle has emerged as a multi-national company that serves as a brand in itself as well as an umbrella company for many well recognized processed food commodity brands. Nestle was established in 1867, with the distribution of its first product, a dehydrated baby food; this product quickly made the company profitable. Through a series of well-coordinated mergers and the growth of a vast selection of innovative food products, Nestle became the global giant it is today. Nestle’s success can be attributed to its deep agricultural supply chain, strong local market teams, hiring from within, and long tenured CEOs. Nestle has become the epitome of innovation and success in the retail food product industry.

In 1996 Nestle established the Nestle Environmental Management System (NEMS) in an attempt to produce more environmentally friendly products. NEMS required innovative eco-design in the company’s products and activities, and gave preference to suppliers who worked to improve their levels of efficiency and sustainability regarding their use of resources. Aside from this, NEMS also requires independent environmental auditing regarding the practices of the company. In addition, environmental awareness training for the employees and business partners is required.

Nestle launched Sustainable Agriculture Initiative…...

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