Modernization Theory, Strengths and Weaknesses

In: Social Issues

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SCHOOL: | ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT | DEPARTMENT: | FORESTRY AND LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT | UNIT TITLE: | EMERGING TROPICAL PLANT RESOURCES | UNIT CODE: | ENF 303 | ASSIGNMENT: | QUESTION 1 & 2 | INSTRUCTOR: | MR. OKEYO | STUDENT’S NAME: | RODGERS OYUGI KOGAH | REGISTRATION NUMBER: | I405/0329/2011 | DATE: | 31ST AUGUST, 2013 |

* QUESTION 1. MAKE NOTES ON UNDEREXPLOITED /NEGLECTED PLANT SPECIES HIGHLIGHTING THEIR CLASSIFICATION, TAXONOMY, PROPAGATION, GENETIC RESERVIOUR, MANAGEMENT AND IMPORTANCE.
(a) Albizia lebbeck L.(Woman’s –tongue- tree)
Classification:Underexploited Fodder Plants
Taxonomy.
Kingdom- Plantae
Subkingdom- Tracheobionta
Superdivision- Spermatophyta
Division- Magnoliophyta
Class- Magnoliopsida
Subclass -Rosidae
Order- Fabales
Family- Fabaceae
Genus- Albizias
Species -Albizia lebbeck (L.) Benth. – Woman’s tongue
Common names: * Swahili: Mkingu, mkungu * English: East Indian walnut, frywood, Indian siris, siristree, woman's-tongue-tree,
Propagation
* It is best established using potted seedlings, although bare-rooted seedlings, direct seeding and stump cuttings have all been used successfully. * Seed pretreatment involves scarification and immersion in boiling hot water then cooling and soaking for 24 hours, or acid treatment to break seed-coat dormancy. * Germination improves after storage for 2-4 years, but satisfactory germination (50-60%) has been obtained from fresh seeds. * Freshly collected seed has about 70% germination capacity after 1-2 months. * About 880 pods weigh 1 kg and will yield about 300 g of seed.

Genetic Reservoir * Albizia lebbeck is indigenous to the Indian subcontinent and those areas of south East Asia with a marked dry season (e.g. northeast Thailand, the eastern islands of Indonesia) and the monsoon areas of Australia. * It has been identified widely…...

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