Mapp V. Ohio

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Mapp V. Ohio

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Mapp V. Ohio
This paper will cover Dolree Mapp a woman accused of harboring a fugitive and/ or gambling material in her home. The police soon attempted an illegal search and seizure in her home without a search warrant. This violated her fourth Amendment. The Case at Hand Once officers sought Mapp consent for a search she sent them away on the advice of her lawyer because they did not have a search warrant. Three hours later, the officers attempted once again to gain entrance to her home. When she did not “immediately” answer her door, the officers forced their way into her home. When Ms. Mapp came to the door, she demanded to see the search warrant, and one of the officers waved a piece of paper in front of her, which she snatched in the belief that it was a search warrant it wasn’t. The officers found some magazines in a trunkin her basement, and she was convicted of possession of obscene material Argument by Mapp
Mapp appealed on the grounds that the evidence was the product of an illegal search and seizure by police, because they had no warrant. Thus, Ms. Mapp’s appeal argued that the illegally obtained…...

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