King Richard

In: English and Literature

Submitted By dennis3602001
Words 257
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Assignment: Frameworks—Role in IT Security Domains and Auditing Compliance

Learning Objectives and Outcomes * Identify the role of frameworks in IT security domains and auditing compliance.
To bring about a set of rules and standards to give purpose to a intricate circumstance. It supplies IT departments with something to follow and gives them a constant system of controls. These controls are either prescriptive which help standardize IT operations and tasks but still allowing flexibility. Descriptive provides for governance at a higher level and helps to align IT with business goals.

Assignment Requirements You have been designated as the Strategy Development Officer and have been asked to meet the Defense Spectrum Organization (DSO) Director to help him identify the frameworks required to develop the long-term strategies to address the current and future needs for Department of Defense (DoD) spectrum access. This is necessary because the DSO is the center of excellence for electromagnetic spectrum analysis and the development of integrated spectrum plans. It provides direct operational support to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS), Combatant Commanders, Secretaries of Military Departments, and Directors of Defense Agencies to achieve national security and military objectives, and your analysis will be the first step in helping to develop long-term strategies for the organization. Draft a complete report addressing the following tasks: 1. Identify three frameworks that fit into the organizational scenario. 2. Analyze the scenario based on the identified frameworks. 3. Develop a plan to audit the three identified frameworks for compliance.

Framework | Analysis | Audit Method | | | | | | | | |…...

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