Human Right Africa

In: Business and Management

Submitted By trevschrie
Words 491
Pages 2
Trevor Schreier
Humanities: Africa, Section 5
14 November 2013
Human Rights- Zimbabwe Zimbabwe has had many different issues and concerns dealing with human rights of its citizens. This is demonstrated in state.gov’s human rights report. In this report, it talks much about how the government has taken away and diminished the rights of the people of Zimbabwe in many different ways. One of the major rights they have taken away is the right for the people to choose who runs the country and how it is run. President Robert Mugabe has used torture, abuse, harassment, and arrest to get people on his side and make it nearly impossible for people to actually choose what they want. He has also restricted rights such as freedom of speech. The government also shows violence and discrimination against women, minorities, people with disabilities, and homosexuals. It also has many problems with exploiting children for labor. Wikipedia states that Zimbabwe violates the rights to shelter, food, freedom of movement and residence, freedom of assembly, and the protection of the law. There are assaults of the media and anyone who opposes the government frequently is subject to brutal attacks. The global studies book says that, in general, freedom has been improving since 1990. Just because it has been improving, this does not mean that the conditions are good. The people who do receive their human rights are the ones who support Mugabe and the Zanu-Pf. If you do support them, no harm will be done to you and you are mostly free to do what you want. On the other hand, if you go against them in any way, they will try to take away all your rights and force you to do things their way. An allafrica.com article titled Zimbabwe still a long way to clear landmines shows an example of how the government violates human rights of its citizens. It talks about how there are six…...

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