How to Read

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Submitted By ballislife201
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The three symbols I used for my book cover is Broken Glasses, Fire, and the Beast. On the book cover, you can see a fire made smoking up the sky. In the smoke from the fire, you can see two red eyes. These two red eyes are the beast that the characters in Lord of the Flies imagined. Next to the fire is broken glasses (left). These three symbols show significant symbolism through the book.
The first symbol I will bring up from the four is the broken glasses. The broken glasses belonged to Piggy. The glasses were used to help create the fire for the boys. Piggy's glasses glasses are a symbol of the intellectual and ordered side of humanity. They are a symbol of this because the glasses are the only thing left the boys have that is a part of modern civilization. When the boys don't know how to make a fire, they have to rely on Piggy's glasses. The breaking of the glasses represents the breaking of the last thing the boys had that was close to humanity. Without the glasses, Piggy says "the Island is a sea of meaningless color". This was Piggy's weakness because without his glasses, he could not see anything and didn't know what to do anymore. After Piggy's glasses broke, the boys on the island began to act more like savages and animals which was most of the reason why Piggy ended up dying.
The next symbol is the fire. The fire is a symbol of hope and at the same time destruction. The boys decide to make a fire to try to signal navy ships and get rescued. Ralph says "We've got to have special people looking after the fire. Any day there may be a ship out there and if we have a signal going they'll come and take us off." This quote helps define the piece of how the fire symbolizes hope. They realize if a ship sees the fire, they can finally get off the island. Just as everything seemed to be working out and the fire was going to be the savior, something bad happened. The…...

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