Homers Illusions

In: Historical Events

Submitted By I2ENEGAD3
Words 2532
Pages 11
Analyzing and Deciphering: Homer’s Use of Animal Illustration We share this Earth with millions of animals. Some are vicious, some are gentle. We’ve lived with animals around us all of our lives and most people mould consider themselves very familiar with them. This is one of the reasons why animals make such amazing illustrations. Homer uses animals throughout The Iliad, and with good reason. Certain animals can depict certain emotions and behavior that words alone simply cannot. Homer uses animals in every single book in The Iliad. But throughout the epic, the way Homer uses the animals varies quite a bit. Homer used certain animals in The Iliad more than other animals and purposely so. Animals were used as symbols by the gods, but mostly they were similes. But Homer’s use of animals changes all the way up to the very end. Not only does animal illustration help the reader know and understand the plot better, but it also brings the epic to life. To start things off, Zeus uses an eagle as a good omen for Agamemnon. “And Zeus that instant launched about the field the most portentous of all birds, an eagle, pinning in his talons a tender fawn. He dropped it near the beautiful altar of Zeus where the Akhaians made their offerings to Zeus of Omens: and beholding this, knowing the eagle had comedown from Zeus, they flung themselves again upon the Trojans.” (Book 8 Page 183 Lines 280-287) The effect of Zeus sending over “an eagle, pinning in his talons a tender fawn” shows how much strength the eagle has to fly with a rather large animal in its clutches. The fact that the fawn dropped on the altar of Zeus lets the Akhaians know that Zeus generated this signal for them to continue fighting with enormous strength. Homer started being undecisive when it came to Hektor and Aias. He said, “Now both men disengaged their spears and fell on one another like man-eating lions or…...

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