Gender Identity Disorder

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Gender Identity Disorder Defined

To be diagnosis with Gender Identity Disorder (GID) the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV-TR) says “There are two components of Gender Identity Disorder, both of which must be present too make the diagnosis. There must be evidence of a strong and persistent cross- gender identification, which is the desire to be, or the insistence that one is, of the other sex. There must also be evidence of persistent discomfort about one's assigned sex or sense of inappropriateness in the gender role of that sex. To make the diagnosis, there must be evidence of clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning (American Psychiatric Association [DSM-IV-TR], 2000). There are several diagnosis mentioned in the DSM. Transvestic Fetishism is when heterosexual men cross dress for sexual excitement. These people don't necessarily have childhood cross gender behaviors. Schizophrenia patients may demonstrate Gender Identity Disorder behaviors. The DSM is used by many mental health workers to officially diagnosis a patient, most insurance companies won't pay for treatment if proper diagnosis hasn't been made. Kenneth Zucker PH.D. is a well known psychologist and sexologist, and head of the child and adolescent gender identity clinic at Toronto's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. Zucker supports GID being listed as a disorder in the DSM. He has also been chosen to by the APA to be chair of the Sexual and Gender Identity Disorder work group in revising the DSM fifth edition. According to Shelley Janiczek Woodson, PH.D. “In fairness, it could be argued that any mental health professional working with and/or studying transgender people has some inherent level of conflict of interest in the revision or elimination of the controversial diagnosis of Gender Identity…...

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