Frankenstein: Motif

In: English and Literature

Submitted By mjpetracca
Words 505
Pages 3
Frankenstein is a novel that explores what can happen if one decides to go against the laws of nature with science. Victor frankenstein, an intelligent but selfish man, created a monster in what I believe to be an attempt to make up for the loss of his mother. The monster itself was not necessarily a “monster”, but after horrible treatment and cruel judgements by people including it’s own creator it became one. The people reacted so negatively to the creation because it was unnatural; this was a recurring idea throughout the novel. In contrast to the unnatural monster, there is an emphasis on the beauty of nature and of what is natural, along with many other elements of romanticism. Frankenstein calls attention to the relation of nature and beauty in contrast to the idea of unnatural monstrosities.
Beauty and Nature is a clear motif in the novel, and this can be seen primarily with the monster itself. It was clearly not natural as it was made by a man using pieces of decomposing humans, and people reacted to it as such. the unnatural creation was anything but beautiful; in fact, it was frightening. The only reason that the monster was treated as it was, was its appearance. This can be seen specifically when the monster was living near the family in the cottage. The old blind man was welcoming and kind to the monster, but the children, who could see the hideous unnatural creation, forced it to leave and then separated themselves from the monster further by moving.
Along with the people in the novel showing clear disapproval and disgust towards the unnatural creation, there is a significant focus on a retreat to nature to make up for the monster. Victor Frankenstein, specifically, finds refuge secluded in nature whenever he is distressed about the horrors he has caused through his creation. This creates division between the two concepts. The idea of the unnatural…...

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