Emotional Intelligece

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By traciemr
Words 7855
Pages 32
Slide 1 – What is Emotional Intelligence?

You may be wondering what emotional intelligence is and why it is so important; if so you are not alone. Many people do not realize that emotional intelligence can be just as important if not more important than your actual IQ when it comes to obtaining success in both your personal life as well as your career. Your emotional intelligence is simply the ability to understand the people around you. Once you understand what emotions are used in order to motivate yourself and others you will be able to work cooperatively with others in a way that is beneficial to everyone.

By increasing your emotional intelligence you will be able to read the signals of others and use the appropriate emotions when reacting to them. Regardless of the personality type that you are dealing with, you can respond in a way that will provide the best outcome once you understand the key factors to emotional intelligence. By developing these skills you will have the ability to understand, empathize and negotiate with others successfully. In order to improve your emotional intelligence you must understand that self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy and social skills all play a role in your emotional intelligence.

Learning self-awareness is crucial in developing your emotional intelligence and will allow you to recognize emotions as they happen; and in turn dealing with these emotions right away. In order to develop your level of self-awareness you will need to tune into and evaluate your own emotions so that you can effectively manage them in a productive way. Once you understand how your emotions can effect a situation you will be able to improve your ability to deal with these emotions as they happen.

While you cannot control what emotions you have; you can control the way in which you are able to…...

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