Dialogic

In: Other Topics

Submitted By warriorboix
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The first argumentative strategy dialogic can be defined by a conversation between people. Most of the time when someone uses the dialogic strategy, it consists of two characters. In stories, dialogic often have two characters that have a dialogue conversation. Usually, one of characters says more things than the other with two different points of views. In “Apology of Socrates”, Socrates tries to plead for his innocence and talks to Meletus. The majority of the time, Socrates tried to persuade his audience into believing what he was doing was right. There was a few times where Meletus spoke to answer a few of Socrates’ questions. Confessional is the second argumentative strategy in which someone opens up to their intentions. Confessional can be used when someone reveals their motivation for doing something. It can also be used to talk about a purpose for an action someone took. David Henry Thoreau wrote “Why I Went to the woods” to explain why he did not want to live the city. He tries to convince his readers that living life means to not live in city but to live in the wilderness. He explains his reasons why he believed that living in city was not living. Didactic can be defined as a lecture. The argumentative strategy is meant to teach an audience new lessons and new things. When teachers and professors teach their classes, they lecture and use a didactic approach to teach their students. In “Politics and the English Language,” George Orwell attempts to teach his readers about how the English language can affect politics in some of the way people speak. Orwell tries to teach his readers what they can do to avoid any confusion while talking to anybody. Lastly, Epistolary is a letter of instruction. Usually, people using this argumentative strategy use it in a religious way. Epistolary is meant to tell a story from a character’s point of view. Martin Luther…...

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