Developing Effective Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

In: Business and Management

Submitted By claytonwill55
Words 4434
Pages 18
Abstract

In order for a business to be successful and competitive the leader must keep employees engaged in the company. Business does not thrive unless there is a leader who exemplifies emotional intelligence. Managers want to make sure employees feel compensated for their hard work, but also making sure the company is not putting themselves in a hole on the balance sheet. Businesses have fallen due to lack of knowledge about how to keep employees interested so that they can be productive for the business. Leaders must understand and create procedures that are both positive and beneficial to the business. The success that a business can have depends on the leadership style that is chosen.

Keywords: Leader, Workforce, employee

Leadership Styles

Leadership styles have multiple effects not only in small businesses but also in the world's largest corporations. These styles have an impact on everyone from senior management to the newest college intern. They help form the corporate culture that shapes the organization and its performance (Carraher). Autocratic Style Effects, also known as authoritarian leadership, autocratic style clearly helps identify the division between leaders and workers. Autocratic leaders make decisions with little or no involvement from employees. These leaders are supremely confident and comfortable with the decision-making responsibility for company operating and strategic plans (Carraher). Although research indicates that autocratic leaders show less creativity than more contemporary styles, this style is still effective when fast decisions need to be made without employee involvement. Employees may feel disengaged with this style.

Participative leadership effects can also be called democratic leadership. This style is usually considered on of the most useful for most companies.…...

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