Context Culture

In: Business and Management

Submitted By abhahn
Words 800
Pages 4
LCC refers to situations where communicators depend on explicit message coding and in which personal style plays a central role in the communication. This style is prevalent in Low-context, typically Western cultures, in which communication is relatively informal and intimate. A culture can be either high context or low context which is related to the way people communicating with each other. Jandt (2004: 61) defined high-context cultures as cultures where the meaning of message is in the physical environment or already shared by people thus people do not need to say or write more.It is important to remember that every individual uses both high-context and low context communication; it is not simply a matter of choosing one over the other. Often, the types of relationships we have with others and our circumstances will dictate the extent to which we rely more on literal or implied meanings.
To better understand high-context and low-context communication, ask the following:
• Do I recognize implied messages from others, and am I aware of the verbal and nonverbal cues that let me understand the speaker's meaning? (High-Context)
• Do I "let my words speak for themselves?" Do I prefer to be more direct, relying on what is explicitly stated in my speech? (Low-Context)
Novelist Amy Tan describes the differences in cultural communication this way: "An American business executive may say, 'Let's make a deal,' and the Chinese manager may reply, 'Is your son interested in learning about your widget business?' Each to his or her own purpose, each with his or her own linguistic path."
When individuals from high-context and low-context cultures collaborate, there are often difficulties that occur during the exchange of information. These problems can be separated into differences concerning "direction", "quantity" and "quality." For example, employees from high-context…...

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