China V India

In: Business and Management

Submitted By miacarter
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Pages 3
Drawbacks and Benefits of Electronic Medical Records
Mia M. Carter
AIU Online International
September 7, 2013

Abstract

This paper will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using electronic medical record systems for the patients /clients and the providers. Since 2009 the Stimulus package was signed into law, which it represents one of the largest American initiatives to this date that is supposed to encourage a large widespread use of EMRs., (Nir Menachemi & Taleah Collum, 2011).

Drawbacks and Benefits of Electronic Medical Records

This paper will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using electronic medical record systems for the patients /clients and the providers. Since 2009 the Stimulus package was signed into law, which it represents one of the largest American initiatives to this date that is supposed to encourage a large widespread use of EMRs, (Nir Menachemi & Taleah Collum, 2011).
Electronic Medical Records gives ways on various aspects of clients and patient’s care that is prescribed. This sort of storing information on medical history and health related information is being stored in digital format other than on traditional paper, (Henry Schein, 2013). Some ways provider’s benefits from electronic medical record system are evaluation and immediate retrieval at the provider’s and other qualified staff fingertips, (Henry Schein, 2013). Some other benefits for providers and other medically approved staff are operating and financial benefits, improved quality and medical errors, better ability to conduct research, and improved population health and reduced cost, (Nir Menachemi, Taleah Collum, 2011).
Some advantages of patient outcomes from the patient’s perspective are a lot less fewer mistakes or errors found within their personal health records, improved treatment and diagnosis, care is much faster, decision making from…...

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