Ceibs

In: Business and Management

Submitted By candyliuyi
Words 865
Pages 4
Yi Liu
INBU5315

Executive Summary

Situation Overview:

* The most important problem faced by CEIBS is what should the identity of the should be, should CEIBS focus on teaching excellence only and eschew research, or should also aspire to create knowledge of the highest quality on management issues, including those specific to China. * The primary cause of this problem is the history of CEIBS is not long, CEIBS is still a very young business school, the business model of top business schools in China is not that mature as leading US business schools. The network influence and contribution from alumni is not large as compared to US and EU leading teaching institutions. The faculty team is lack of a stable system as all the professors are 3-5 years contract instead of long term relationship.

Action Overview:

To solve the problem, CEIBS should make the following changes to its strategy and tactics.
Proposed changes in the strategy: * Establish a unique business model for CEIBS, as its unique positioning as an interface between China and the world. CEIBS will face increased competition and challenges from the rapid rise of both local business schools and international schools entering China. * CEIBS must continually innovate and strategically upgrade. CEIBS should balance the need to adapt international –standard knowledge to business realities in China. * Currently, China’s economy has entered a new stage. The goal of CEIBS in this new stage must be to become a business which truly gains a foothold in China. It is still unclear what CEIBS’s vision really is, CEIBS should take full advantage of China and Shanghai factor, to strengthen practice-based research including the development of case studies. * As for faculty recruitment, it is necessary to focus on those interested in applied research.
Proposed changes in the tactics:…...

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