Can a Humanistic Approach Be Integrated with a Cognitive Therapy Approach

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By AliC69
Words 2284
Pages 10
Can a humanistic model of counselling be integrated with a cognitive one?

In this essay I am going to compare the Person-Centred Therapy founded by Carl Rogers and the Cognitive Therapy Model of Aaron Becks. I shall compare the two approaches, outlining the theory to explain their similarities as well as their differences. I shall compare the two approaches to show whether a humanistic and cognitive approach can be integrated successfully into a therapy session. In order to compare the two approaches it is necessary to summarise the main features of the two. Cognitive Therapy in brief can be described as: 1. Formulating a plan for treatment. 2. Focussing on the current, presenting problems as defined by the client. 3. Goal setting. 4. Time-limited. 5. Agreement to set and complete homework. 6. Connecting the way a client thinks about situations and how they feel and behave in order to change these thoughts. 7. Assisting the client in identifying and using coping skills for self-help in the future.
Cognitive Therapy (CT) is organised around a formulation devised by Becks in 1976 to assist patients who were suffering from depression. The aim of CT is to understand the person's environment, values, beliefs and the way the person assesses events in their life. The CT model evaluates how people believe that a situation affects their feelings, behaviour and their view of 'self' and 'others'. A CT Therapist believes these views will be distorted and this distortion causes the clients problems. The therapist refers to these beliefs as negative automatic thoughts (NATs). The CT therapist will therefore work with a client's NATs to help the client to see these views as inaccurate. The CT therapist will do this by challenging the clients perceptions of their views (commonly called core beliefs (or schemas)) of themselves and the world…...

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