Boston Masss

In: Social Issues

Submitted By JohnSmith1222
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American Revolution and 1831 ! ! All starting on March 5, 1770 with the Boston Massacre when a troop of British

soldiers opened fired on a group of protesters. Then later in 1773 the Coercive Acts were put into place allowing British troops to stay in and occupy houses American were already living in. These Acts also came with the closing of the Port of Boston and allowing British soldiers to be tried for crimes back home in Britain. This was an outrage to the Americans, the colonies had to come together to deiced what they were going to do get rid of the British. They eventually knew that they needed to take the British to war so they could finally separate from them. ! On April 19, 1775 the war began in Concord and Lexington where the British tried

to sneak up on the Americans and disarm them and capture leaders Sam Adams and John Hancock in the morning hours of the day. From a series of horseback riders like Paul Revere, the word was able to be spread that the British were on there way. After a series of defeats like Bunker Hill, Long Island, and New York. The American battled back in Valley Forge, Saratoga, and Yorktown where they cornered Cornwallis and his troops and made his surrender. In 1783 the Treaty of Paris was signed to give America its Freedom from Britain.

!

Following the American Revolution the Continental Congress adopted the Articles

of Confederation in 1777. It had no authority in interstate disputes and only could request taxes and troops from individual states. A few year later came the Northwest Ordinances of !784, 85, and 87 formulating a policy for new states west of the Appalachian Mountains. ! 1780’s Massachusetts farmers were struggling with high debt as they tried to

start new farms. Massachusetts unlike any other state didn’t pass new Pro- Debtor Laws that entitled debt to be forgiven and more paper money to be printed.…...

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