Astronomy Assignment

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Submitted By georgechebo
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When light having a continuous spectrum passes through a cool gas, the resulting spectrum is:
Select one: a. an absorption spectrum b. Any of the choices listed, depending on the chemical composition of the gas. c. an emission spectrum d. a continuous spectrum

Which of the following features determines the resolving power of a telescope?
Select one: a. The focal length of the eyepiece. b. The diameter of the objective. c. The diameter of the eyepiece. d. The focal length of the objective.

Suppose that you have a (good) reflecting telescope and a (good) refracting telescope with the same diameter objective. Which one has an objective that did not require correction for chromatic aberration as it was constructed?
Select one: a. No general statement can be made. b. Both c. Neither d. The reflector e. The refractor

The number of sunspots
Select one: a. becomes maximum near the poles. b. has been increasing since they were first recorded. c. changes with a cycle of about 11 years. d. has been decreasing since they were first recorded by Galileo.

Which of the following can be detected by using the Doppler effect?
Select one: a. The rotation of planets b. The radial motion of a star moving toward the Earth c. The rotation of the Sun d. The motion of binary star systems e. All of the motions listed can be detected in this manner.

What keeps the Sun from collapsing due to its strong gravitational field?
Select one: a. The Sun’s interior is cooler than its surface. b. The Sun’s interior cannot be compressed. c. Pressure at each part of the Sun balances the weight of the material above it.

The energy of a photon is directly proportional to the light’s
Select one: a. frequency. b. temperature. c. wavelength.

The sun emits most of its visible light in the_____ region of the…...

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