Assess the View That There Are Objective Values (I.E. Moral Facts).

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Assess the view that there are objective values (i.e. moral facts).
Moral realism is the theory that moral statements have a truth value and there are moral facts to determine said truth values. Moral realists believe moral facts can exist independent of our knowledge of them, therefore moral facts need no proof to exist and we do not necessarily know any moral facts to determine a statements truth value. This theory belongs to cognitivism which is a collection of theories that claim that moral statements have a truth value; however moral realism differs from other cognitivist theories like error theory. Error theory states that while moral statement have a truth value there are no moral facts so all positive moral statements are false. Although both theories state that moral statements have a truth value they disagree on whether or not moral facts exist to determine the truth value of a statement.
The implications of moral realism are that moral statements like “abortion is wrong” can be objectively true and they are not just simple matters of opinion. This means that people can hold false views on morality just as people who believe the earth is flat hold a false view; therefore this implies that moral knowledge and moral ignorance are possibilities. Some people, like Martin Luther King, seem morally knowledgeable which fits in with the idea of moral realism as they believe in moral facts and facts must be able to be learnt. However, we cannot know what the moral facts are to be learnt so although we may think we have moral knowledge we may not have any at all. Moral knowledge is just an assumption and our apparently factual language about morality might just be an error, this is one view from Mackie’s error theory. A moral realist might ask how we would be able to explain the likes of Nelson Mandela and others who do seem to have some special grasp on morality…...

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