Asia in the World

In: People

Submitted By sdhalena
Words 1247
Pages 5
This unit introduces Asian Studies and International Relations. Considering both traditional and contemporary times, it seeks to place Asia’s diverse cultures in a global context. It examines issues such as how to define Asia, how Asian states related to each other, and how Western ideas of international relations have transformed these relations. The unit has two strands, each considering a set of ideas. First it examines the great religions/philosophies of Asian societies – Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Christianity and Confucianism – have influenced them. It then considers international relations theory and how theories can help us understand the complexities of Asian states’ relations with each other and the wider world.
Credit point value 10
Pre-requisites Nil
Co-requisites Nil
Unit/s incompatible with and not to be counted for credit Nil
Unit level 1
Assumed knowledge None
Attendance requirements
Attendance below 80% at tutorials without due cause may constitute grounds for failure. Non-attendance in tutorials for illness or misadventure or other reasons should be documented and submitted to the unit coordinator upon return.
Enrolment restrictions Nil

Unit learning outcomes
Students who successfully complete this unit will be able to:
• identify of the diversity and complexity of Asia;
• explain the social manifestations and international political impact of Islam, Hinduism, Christianity, Buddhism and Confucianism in an Asian context;
• evaluate the balance between continuity and change in Asian traditions and contemporary societies;
• conduct research on traditional and modern concepts of international relations, particularly in an Asian context;
• understand the main theories of international relations; and
• analyse and break-down major recent and contemporary international issues in Asia.
Unit content
==> Defining Asia and its…...

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