Analysis of Tensile Strength of Standard Metal Specimen

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Submitted By physics186
Words 2065
Pages 9
Analysis of Tensile Strength of Standard Metal Specimen

CE 121 Structural Engineering I
Professor. Tzavelis

09/18/2013

Sasha Vera – Theory, Revision of the report
Mary M. Mazur – Discussion and Conclusions
Jae Ho Jang – Objective, Experiment, Lab assist
Quinee J. Quintana – Drawings of equipment
Jae Sung Song – Data, Results, Calculations

Table of Contents

Section Page
I. Objective 2
II. Experiment 3
III. Theory 4
IV. Results 6
V. Sample Calculations 10
VI. Discussion and Conclusions 11
VII. Reference 13
Appendices
Appendix A. Drawings of Equipment 14
Appendix B. Experimental Data 16
Appendix C. Picture of the failure 17

List of Tables
Table 1. Dimensions of the Specimen
Table 2. Stress and Strain
Table 3. Theoretical Strain
Table 4. Offset Strain
Table 5. Tensile Properties
Table 6. Experimental Data
List of Figures
Figure 1. Plot of Experimental and Theoretical Data
Figure 2. Graph for Elastic Region
Figure 3. 0.1% and 0.5% Offset Intersection
Figure 4. 0.1% and 0.5% Offset Intersection at 100psi Interval Scale
Figure 5. Failure of the Specimen
I. Objective

The objective of the experiment was to test a sample specimen for various physical properties such as yield stress and ultimate tensile stress. The sample specimen was mounted on the Tinius Olsen Tension and Compression Machine with 120,000lbs capacity located in the Structural Analysis Lab (room LL210). Then the specimen was subjected to a tensile load until failure. By analyzing the type of failure and elongation of the specimen under continuously increasing load, the mechanical properties of the specimen could be verified. Furthermore, the relationship between stress and strain could be confirmed by the experiment.

II. Experiment

The sample aluminum bar specimen (2024-T351) was mounted on Tinius Olsen Tension…...

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